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5 ways to improve the air quality in your home

Last updated: 01-15-2021

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5 ways to improve the air quality in your home

5 ways to improve the air quality in your home
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January 10, 2021, 9:00 p.m.
·5 min read
With more time spent indoors, winter is the perfect time to tackle projects around the house. From renovations you can complete in one weekend to cleaning tips for every room, Canadian Tire and Yahoo are bringing you everything you need for the season .
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Home should always be a place you go to for comfort and relaxation. It shouldn’t be a place that triggers sneezing, congestion and general discomfort.
If the latter is the case for you, there’s a good possibility you have an indoor air quality issue. Ignoring it could lead to serious health issues and is especially harmful to those who suffer from allergies, asthma and other respiratory issues. It’s also just plain uncomfortable. You don’t have to have the keenest senses to tell if you’re breathing in less than pristine air.
So the question is, how do we clean something we can’t see? The solution is actually quite easy and there are a number of simple and inexpensive things you can implement to immediately improve the air in your home. Check out our these five tips to improve the quality of your home’s air below.
Tidy up
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The first line of defense against poor indoor air quality is cleaning. We don’t just mean putting your dishes away and occasionally wiping the counter. Make it a point to regularly give your home a deep clean, from dusting and vacuuming to washing and changing your sheets.
A vacuum is one of the most valuable cleaning tools when it comes to air quality so invest in a good one. One of the most highly rated vacuums on the market is the Dyson’s Cyclone V10 Cordless vacuum . The lightweight and slim appliance removes even the most ground in dirt and its advanced filtration system captures 99.97% of microscopic dust particles.
Find the right air purifier for your space
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Air purifiers have been proven to vastly improve indoor air quality — but how do you find the right purifier for your space? Start by deciding what room(s) your air purifier will live in, because it will need to have a clean air delivery rate (CADR) that is large enough for that space. A HEPA filter is also a must-have, as the dense filter captures all those harmful particles like dust, pet dander and even smoke.
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For small or medium sized rooms, the AeraMax DX5Air Purifier is a great choice. Along with an aesthetically pleasing design, it’s as quiet as a mouse and notifies you when the filter needs to be changed. For larger rooms, consider the Dyson Pure Cool™ HEPA Air Purifier & Fan Tower . This state-of-the-art air purifying fan reports on air quality and filters out even the smallest particles, including gas and smoke.
If you’re working from home, you may even want to consider a small air purifier for your desk. The NOMA True HEPA Small Air Purifier is compact, effective and will contribute to a productive work environment.
Improve ventilation
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Ever walk into a room with no windows and get immediately hit by the overwhelming feeling of stale air?
The easiest way to improve ventilation is to open windows and let fresh air in, but some rooms don’t have that ability. If you have a windowless room you can still improve ventilation by utilizing a fan, or just keeping the doors and windows open in neighbouring rooms.
For this purpose, a simple oscillating fan will do the trick. The For Living Oscillating Desk Fan is a budget-friendly pick that’s easy to use and will vastly improve your air circulation.
A ceiling fan can also work wonders when it comes to air circulation. We like this sleek, modern-looking option from Hunter.
Maintain a healthy level of humidity
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While air purifiers are great at removing dust particles, pet dander and smoke, dehumidifiers remove moisture from the air and minimize the humidity level in a room.
Lowering the humidity level will immediately result in a fresher overall feeling, plus, mold and mildew will have a harder time growing and spreading, which will also eliminate any unpleasant musty odours a room may hold.
For a budget friendly solution, Concrobium Moisture Grabbers are great for small spaces like closets and bathrooms. These little pouches work similar to a dehumidifier by collecting moisture from the air and locking it away, but without the added cost of electricity.
Cook on an induction stove instead of gas
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One of the major contributors to indoor air pollution are gas stoves. If you think about it, it’s no big surprise. You’re essentially burning gas in your home and releasing fumes like nitrogen oxide and carbon monoxide.
An alternative to gas stoves that will improve indoor air quality is to switch to an induction cooktop. While there’s a bit of a learning curve to using an induction stove, you’ll eventually find your rhythm.
You’ll also need to adjust to using stainless steel cookware. The PADERNO Canadian Signature Stainless Steel Cookware 13 piece set includes all the essential pots and pans you’ll need to whip up a great meal using your new air-friendly appliance.
Canadian Tire and Yahoo Canada are helping Canadians make the most of winter, with snow removal advice, winter driving checklists and ideas on how to keep the whole family entertained and having fun all season long. Click here for more!
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U.S. House of Representatives poised to impeach Trump again — but to what end?
Donald Trump's norm-shattering presidency risks earning ignominious new distinctions over the coming days that will trail him into his post-presidency and far into the afterlife.  The U.S. president's political epitaph will carry the legacy of two upcoming votes in the House of Representatives, including on impeachment in the fallout of last week's mob attack on the U.S. Capitol that he's accused of inspiring. Trump will soon likely become the only U.S. president impeached twice; the only president formally targeted for expulsion under the 25th amendment; and, possibly but far less likely, the only president convicted by the Senate and barred from ever seeking office again.  The first in this series of votes is expected Tuesday night after 7:30 p.m. ET. in the House. "The president represents an imminent threat to our Constitution, our country and the American people, and he must be removed from office immediately," House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, a Democrat, said Monday. "The president's threat to America is urgent, and so too will be our action." Pelosi laid out a two-step plan that begins with a vote on the 25th amendment to the U.S. constitution, enacted in the wake of John F. Kennedy's assassination. It allows a change in leadership if a body of Congress, the vice president, and more than half the cabinet agree to oust the president.  Plan A and Plan B Given the slim chances of Vice-President Mike Pence and the majority of the cabinet turning on the president, Democrats have prepared Plan B for the next day, an article of impeachment to be voted on as early as Wednesday that accuses the president of inciting an insurrection for his role in the attack on the U.S. Capitol last week. The resolution noted that Trump addressed a rally shortly before his supporters mounted the attack and says he made statements that "encouraged and foreseeably resulted in" the lawless actions at the Capitol.  Impeachment appears to have the votes to pass the House, based on its Democratic support alone although it could also attract a few Republicans. The question many will ask, and Republicans are certainly asking, is: Why now? Trump is slated to leave office in a week and has just promised a peaceful transition. The main Republican argument against impeachment is that this move will drop a match on a country that's a political tinder box. Top Republican pushes back on impeachment That tinder box already shows signs of blowing — the FBI warns of plans for armed protests across the country; there is chatter on social media about militia attacks; at least 10,000 National Guard troops are being called to the capital; and even the Washington Monument is being shut down amid threats.   Republicans are urging their rivals to move on, and let President-elect Joe Biden launch his presidency under unifying terms, focused on enacting his own agenda. Even one Democratic senator thinks this is a poor idea.  Joe Manchin of West Virginia called this a terrible moment for impeachment: "This is so ill-advised," Manchin told Fox News. He predicted impeachment would fail again in a Senate trial just like it did last year, and only sour the start of Biden's presidency. That's because an impeachment might not even get to a Senate trial until after the presidential transition — raising the question of what difference this now makes. Two arguments for impeaching now Impeachment supporters offer two retorts to that. One is principled; the other practical.  On the matter of principle, they say the current U.S. president richly deserves this reprimand that will stain his legacy, and say it also establishes necessary boundaries for future presidential behaviour. Some legal scholars interviewed agreed Trump deserves this sanction. Joseph Ellis is a Pulitzer Prize-winning historian who participates in published rankings of the best to worst presidents in history. "The second impeachment will solidify that certainty that Donald Trump will be listed last [on the lists of best to worst president]," Ellis said. "Without question Trump is the worst president in American history." He said the president, in his opinion, has probably committed five or six known impeachable acts throughout his presidency. Then there's a practical reason — and it has more to do with the four-year period ahead of us than the four years we've just witnessed. It's about whether Trump can be stripped of his political power going forward, a power that stems in part from his ability to run for office again.  Could strip Trump of ability to run again It's notable that the impeachment article drafted by Democratic lawmakers refers to the Constitution's 14th amendment. Written after the Civil War, it forbade anyone engaged in insurrection from ever again seeking political office. So if the House impeaches Trump, Senate Republicans will have two hot potatoes to handle. One is the obvious question of whether to convict Trump. The second, arguably more consequential, question: If the Senate did actually convict him, what penalty would it impose?  That punishment could include disqualification from future office, which would require a simple majority vote, according to historical precedent in non-presidential impeachment cases. Don't automatically assume Senate Republicans will be as supportive of Trump as the last time he was impeached.  One observer suspects many Washington Republicans would love to bury Trump politically. Legal ethics scholar Clark Cunningham said they would have a variety of motivations for wanting to sideline Trump — including those with their own ambition to run for president in 2024. "I think very few people in the Senate, including Republicans, want Donald Trump running for president again or exercising substantial leadership in this country," said Cunningham, a professor of law and ethics at Georgia State University.  WATCH | There could be violence at Biden's inauguration, FBI warns: "I don't think there's any question about that." That's why Cunningham thinks Democrats should try building bipartisan consensus however possible, including in the drafting of the impeachment article. Republican: We're scared of Trump supporters He says the current wording is a mistake. Cunningham said proving that someone incited an insurrection is too complicated, hinging on interpretations of the definition of "incitement" and "insurrection." Cunningham says seditious conspiracy would have been a simpler allegation to prove. Republicans have another reason to fear going along with this, one that speaks to the gravity of this American political moment. It involves angering people like that mob that stormed the Capitol.  A rookie congressman from Michigan, Republican Peter Meijer, wrote in an op-ed about the terror his colleagues face. He said he knows one lawmaker who voted to overturn the election results last Wednesday night out of fear that family members might be harmed. Meijer, who voted to confirm Biden's presidency, said: "I have been called a traitor more times than I can count. I regret not bringing my gun to D.C." It's still early to gauge the political effects of last week: some polling suggests Trump's support has dropped to its lowest level in three years, and that Republicans oppose the Capitol storming, but other polling suggests Republicans overwhelmingly wanted Biden's win overturned and were split on the riot. The first dilemma belongs to Trump's vice-president. WATCH | Law prof says there are few options to remove Trump from office: Pence received death threats on social media sites, including Twitter and Parler, since presiding over the congressional ceremony certifying Biden's win. His relationship with Trump is publicly strained. And if the House of Representatives tonight votes to invoke the 25th amendment, the next move is his, in deciding whether to try getting a majority of the cabinet to boot Trump. There's no way that happens, said one law professor who wrote a prescient book before the election on scenarios that might unfold if Trump refused to admit defeat. Lawrence Douglas told CBC News that he can't imagine Pence enraging the majority of Republican voters. "[Maybe] if we lived in a less deformed political landscape," said the professor at Amherst College. "I can't imagine Mike Pence doing that. We need to distinguish between what should happen and what's going to happen. I really cannot imagine Mike Pence doing that." Then it's on to impeachment — again.
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Seoul city criticized for sexist tips to pregnant women
SEOUL, Korea, Republic Of — The government of South Korea's capital is facing criticism for an online manual for pregnant women that contained sexist tips and gender stereotypes.The now-deleted guidelines, which were published on the website of Seoul’s “Pregnancy and Childbirth Information Center,” suggested that pregnant women should prepare food, clothes and daily necessities for their husbands and family before going to the hospital to give birth. They offered tips on weight management that involved hanging up smaller size clothing for motivation and warned women against excessive spending on children’s clothing.South Korea has one of the lowest birthrates in the world, according to the United Nations Population Fund, and is trying to encourage more births. But critics say those efforts have been hampered by a government that often reflects a deeply patriarchal society and widespread sexist views.“It’s like Seoul City is declaring that a wife should take care of all the housework,” Kim Hyomin, a student at Duksung Women’s University, said in a phone interview.The manual was published in 2019, but didn't receive widespread attention until last week, when criticism spread on social media. The belated fury prompted the capital to delete the guidelines and triggered online petitions demanding that it apologize.The Seoul Metropolitan Government acknowledged in a statement Monday that it had failed to thoroughly check the guidelines, which it said were originally from the Ministry of Health and Welfare website, and promised to review city-related websites and educate employees on gender equality.The guidelines also warned women about what they said was the increased risk of premature birth if a husband “suddenly throws himself on top of her” or engages in “aggressive sexual activity.”The guidelines promoted and normalized gender violence, according to Ji-Yeong Yunkim, assistant professor at the Institute of Body and Culture at Konkuk University.“Women are seen as having to sacrifice and take care of adult men, however difficult it is,” Yunkim said.This is not the first time that government efforts to increase the birthrate have backfired.In 2016, South Korea’s Ministry of the Interior launched a “birth map” website that showed the number of women of childbearing age by city district and region. That website was pulled after a public outcry.Yunkim, the professor, said the recurring mishaps by South Korea's government stem from male-dominated institutions' perception of women.“They see women as reproduction tools rather than individuals,” Yunkim said.Juwon Park, The Associated Press
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What you need to know about COVID-19 in Ottawa on Tuesday, Jan. 12
Recent developments: Four more people in the wider region have died of COVID-19. The owner of the Ottawa Senators wants up to 6,000 fans to attend home games. What's the latest? Ontario is introducing a series of new restrictions including a stay-at-home order prohibiting people from leaving their homes except for essential reasons such as buying groceries, exercising and accessing health care. The order goes into effect Thursday. Bylaw officers will have the power to fine people found outside their homes without a valid reason. Awaiting more details of the province's new stay-at-home order, city officials in Ottawa say the effect of it will likely resemble last spring's lockdown. An earlier briefing on the latest pandemic models suggests the original lockdown has not done enough to slow the spread of the coronavirus. WATCH LIVE | Ontario releases new COVID-19 rules: Ottawa is reporting 63 more cases of COVID-19, while its number of COVID-19 patients requiring intensive care is the highest it's been since May. Four more people from the wider region have died of COVID-19. Ottawa Senators owner Eugene Melnyk tweeted on Tuesday that it's time to allow fans to attend home games at Canadian Tire Centre despite the COVID-19 pandemic, but later backtracked, saying "that time is not now." How many cases are there? In Ottawa, 11,658 people have tested positive for COVID-19. There are 1,157 known active cases, 10,013 resolved cases and 398 deaths from COVID-19.  Public health officials have reported more than 20,800 COVID-19 cases across eastern Ontario and western Quebec, including about 17,900 resolved cases. Ninety-nine people have died of COVID-19 elsewhere in eastern Ontario and 136 people have died in western Quebec.  CBC Ottawa is profiling those who've died of COVID-19. If you'd like to share your loved one's story, please get in touch. What can I do? Ontario says people need to only leave home when essential and not leave their health unit to avoid more COVID-19 cases, hospitalizations and deaths — including in areas with low case counts. If residents leave the province they should isolate for 14 days upon returning. No indoor events or private gatherings are allowed, except with people who live together or one other home for people living alone. Outdoor gatherings with friends or family people don't live with are not recommended. Legally these gatherings can't have more than five people. Ottawa's new rules for outdoor recreation are now in effect. In-person shopping is limited to essential businesses. Others can offer pickup and delivery. WATCH | Why several small businesses are teaming up to get through the pandemic: Child-care centres are open, while day camps are not.  The lockdown rules are in place in eastern Ontario until Jan. 23, although that could change for each health unit depending on the data. Ottawa Public Health (OPH) says its COVID-19 spread is again a crisis, with levels as high as it's ever seen. It set a one-day case record of 234 people on Saturday. Cases have also spiked in the Eastern Ontario Health Unit, where its medical officer of health says too many cases are from workplaces and people seeing others in person. In western Quebec, residents are asked not to leave home unless it's essential, with an exception for people living alone who can visit one other home. That exception aside, people can only see other people in person who they live with. Quebec's 8 p.m. to 5 a.m. curfew is now in effect, with fines of up to $6,000 for breaking the rules. Gatineau police say they've issued more than 40 tickets in its first two nights. It has shut down non-essential businesses and has extended secondary school closures until next week. There is no indoor dining at restaurants, while gyms, cinemas and performing arts venues are all closed. Travel from one region to another is discouraged throughout Quebec. Those rules are in place until Feb. 8. WATCH | Chelsea, Que., mayor on the early days of the curfew: Distancing and isolating The novel coronavirus primarily spreads through droplets when an infected person coughs, sneezes, breathes or speaks onto someone or something. These droplets can hang in the air. People can be contagious without symptoms. This means people should take precautions such as staying home when they have symptoms, keeping hands and frequently touched surfaces clean and maintaining distance from anyone they don't live with — even with a mask on. Ontario has abandoned its concept of social circles. Masks are mandatory in indoor public settings in Ontario and Quebec and should be worn outdoors when people can't distance from others.  OPH says residents should wear masks outside their homes whenever possible. Three-layer non-medical masks with a filter are recommended. Anyone with COVID-19 symptoms should self-isolate, as should those who've been ordered to do so by their public health unit. The length varies in Ontario and Quebec. Anyone returning to Canada must go straight home and stay there for 14 days. Air travellers have to show recent proof of a negative COVID-19 test. Health Canada recommends older adults and people with underlying medical conditions and/or weakened immune systems stay home as much as possible and get friends and family to help with errands. WATCH | An Ottawa ICU doctor shares some COVID-19 rule ideas: Symptoms and vaccines COVID-19 can range from a cold-like illness to a severe lung infection, with common symptoms including fever, a cough, vomiting and loss of taste or smell. Children can develop a rash. If you have severe symptoms, call 911. Mental health can also be affected by the pandemic and resources are available to help. COVID-19 vaccines have been given to health-care workers and long-term care residents in Ottawa and western Quebec.  Vaccines are expected in Hawkesbury today or tomorrow, while other rural health units don't know when they'll get vials. About 10,000 Ottawa residents had received at least one dose as of Jan. 6. Its program is currently on pause as health officials wait for more doses. In Ontario, it's expected that vaccination will expand to priority groups such as older adults and essential workers in April, with vaccines widely available to the public in August. Ottawa believes it can have nearly 700,000 residents vaccinated by then. Quebec has a somewhat controversial policy of giving a single dose to as many people as possible rather than giving fewer people two doses. As of Jan. 12, western Quebec's health authority had given out about 3,600 doses. Where to get tested In eastern Ontario: Anyone seeking a test should book an appointment. Ontario recommends only getting tested if you have symptoms, if you've been told to by your health unit or the province, or if you fit certain other criteria. In Ottawa, that criteria includes travel since December from or through South Africa or the U.K. or close contact with someone that has. OPH is doing a detailed test of their samples for new, more contagious variants of the coronavirus. People without symptoms but part of the province's targeted testing strategy can make an appointment at select pharmacies. Travellers who need a test have very few local options to pay for one. Ottawa has 10 permanent test sites, with mobile sites wherever demand is particularly high. The Eastern Ontario Health Unit has sites in Alexandria, Casselman, Cornwall, Hawkesbury, Rockland and Winchester. The Alexandria and Casselman sites are temporarily closed for two workweeks. People can arrange a test in Picton by calling the centre or Bancroft, Belleville and Trenton, where online booking is preferred. Kingston's main test site is at the Beechgrove Complex, another is in Napanee. The Leeds, Grenville and Lanark health unit has permanent sites in Almonte, Brockville, Kemptville and Smiths Falls and a mobile clinic for smaller communities or people with problems getting to a site. Renfrew County residents should call their family doctor or 1-844-727-6404 for a test or with any health questions Test clinic locations are posted weekly. In western Quebec: Tests are strongly recommended for people with symptoms and their contacts. Outaouais residents can make an appointment in Gatineau seven days a week at 135 blvd. Saint-Raymond or 617 avenue Buckingham. They can now check the approximate wait time for the Saint-Raymond site. There are recurring clinics by appointment in communities such as Maniwaki, Fort-Coulonge and Petite-Nation. Call 1-877-644-4545 with questions, including if walk-in testing is available nearby. First Nations, Inuit and Métis: Akwesasne has had more than 90 residents test positive on the Canadian side of the border and four deaths. Nearly 200 people have tested positive across the community. Its curfew from 11 p.m. to 5 a.m. is back and it has a COVID-19 test site available by appointment only. Anyone returning to the community on the Canadian side of the international border who's been farther than 160 kilometres away — or visited Montreal — for non-essential reasons is asked to self-isolate for 14 days. The Mohawks of the Bay of Quinte had its only confirmed case in November. Kitigan Zibi logged its first in mid-December and has had more since. People in Pikwakanagan can book a COVID-19 test by calling 613-625-2259.  Anyone in Tyendinaga who's interested in a test can call 613-967-3603. Inuit in Ottawa can call the Akausivik Inuit Family Health Team at 613-740-0999 for service, including testing, in Inuktitut or English on weekdays. For more information
17 hours ago
A look at COVID-19 vaccinations in Canada on Tuesday, Jan. 12, 2021
The latest numbers on COVID-19 vaccinations in Canada as of 4 a.m. ET on Tuesday Jan. 12, 2021.In Canada, the provinces are reporting 39,116 new vaccinations administered for a total of 359,054 doses given. The provinces have administered doses at a rate of 947.39 per 100,000.There were zero new vaccines delivered to the provinces and territories for a total of 545,250 doses delivered so far. The provinces and territories have used 65.85 per cent of their available vaccine supply.Please note that Newfoundland, P.E.I., Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and the territories typically do not report on a daily basis.Newfoundland is reporting 1,975 new vaccinations administered over the past seven days for a total of 3,760 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 7.181 per 1,000. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Newfoundland for a total of 8,250 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 1.6 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 45.58 per cent of its available vaccine supply.P.E.I. is reporting 1,650 new vaccinations administered over the past seven days for a total of 3,600 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 22.694 per 1,000. There were zero new vaccines delivered to P.E.I. for a total of 6,075 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 3.8 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 59.26 per cent of its available vaccine supply.Nova Scotia is reporting zero new vaccinations administered over the past seven days for a total of 2,720 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 2.787 per 1,000. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Nova Scotia for a total of 13,450 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 1.4 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 20.22 per cent of its available vaccine supply.New Brunswick is reporting 4,827 new vaccinations administered over the past seven days for a total of 7,732 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 9.912 per 1,000. There were zero new vaccines delivered to New Brunswick for a total of 11,175 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 1.4 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 69.19 per cent of its available vaccine supply.Quebec is reporting 8,065 new vaccinations administered for a total of 92,452 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 10.805 per 1,000. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Quebec for a total of 115,375 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 1.3 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 80.13 per cent of its available vaccine supply.Ontario is reporting 8,859 new vaccinations administered for a total of 122,105 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 8.313 per 1,000. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Ontario for a total of 196,125 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 1.3 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 62.26 per cent of its available vaccine supply.Manitoba is reporting 855 new vaccinations administered for a total of 10,353 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 7.518 per 1,000. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Manitoba for a total of 25,825 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 1.9 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 40.09 per cent of its available vaccine supply.Saskatchewan is reporting 1,019 new vaccinations administered for a total of 8,948 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 7.588 per 1,000. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Saskatchewan for a total of 17,575 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 1.5 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 50.91 per cent of its available vaccine supply.Alberta is reporting 1,797 new vaccinations administered for a total of 46,791 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 10.629 per 1,000. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Alberta for a total of 59,800 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 1.4 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 78.25 per cent of its available vaccine supply.British Columbia is reporting 13,643 new vaccinations administered for a total of 59,902 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 11.673 per 1,000. There were zero new vaccines delivered to British Columbia for a total of 71,200 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 1.4 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 84.13 per cent of its available vaccine supply.Yukon is reporting 190 new vaccinations administered for a total of 500 doses given. The territory has administered doses at a rate of 11.982 per 1,000. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Yukon for a total of 7,200 doses delivered so far. The territory has received enough of the vaccine to give 17 per cent of its population a single dose. The territory has used 6.944 per cent of its available vaccine supply.The Northwest Territories are reporting zero new vaccinations administered for a total of 162 doses given. The territory has administered doses at a rate of 3.591 per 1,000. There were zero new vaccines delivered to the Northwest Territories for a total of 7,200 doses delivered so far. The territory has received enough of the vaccine to give 16 per cent of its population a single dose. The territory has used 2.25 per cent of its available vaccine supply.Nunavut is reporting zero new vaccinations administered for a total of 29 doses given. The territory has administered doses at a rate of 0.749 per 1,000. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Nunavut for a total of 6,000 doses delivered so far. The territory has received enough of the vaccine to give 15 per cent of its population a single dose. The territory has used 0.4833 per cent of its available vaccine supply.*Notes on data: The figures are compiled by the COVID-19 Open Data Working Group based on the latest publicly available data and are subject to change. Note that some provinces report weekly, while others report same-day or figures from the previous day. Vaccine doses administered is not equivalent to the number of people inoculated as the approved vaccines require two doses per person. The vaccines are currently not being administered to children under 18 and those with certain health conditions.This report was automatically generated by The Canadian Press Digital Data Desk and was first published Jan. 12, 2021.The Canadian Press
17 hours ago
140 international students arriving this week will have to show negative COVID test results
Students from countries as far-flung as Kazakhstan, South Korea, Germany and Chile will start arriving in New Brunswick on Thursday to participate in a program that allows them to attend high schools around the province. All students will have to comply with the new federal regulation, which went into effect last week.They'll have to provide proof of a negative laboratory test result for COVID-19 to the airline prior to boarding a flight to Canada.The test must be taken within 72 hours of departure.Megan Stymiest, corporate counsel and policy manager for the province-owned company Atlantic Education International, said it was expected that the new stipulation would cause "significant headaches" for the students."But I think the majority of countries other than Canada were already there, because it really wasn't an issue."Enrolment back up after dipping in fallEnrolment was down in the fall, when students in the program prepared to stay in New Brunswick for the entire school year, Stymiest said.More than 100 students who came in September have remained in the province. Stymiest says this second semester cohort of 140 students seems more in line with the average. "Our full-time equivalent students that would have been here since September are down, but we're back up and rolling as far as second semester numbers are concerned," she said.No problem finding homestaysMost students are expected to fly into Moncton or Fredericton between Jan. 15 and Jan. 24, Stymiest said. Arrangements have been made for them to self-isolate in hotels for 14 days. While they are there, program staff will be working to make sure that food and meals are delivered and that they get proper nutrition.Students will also have to take a New Brunswick COVID-19 test before they can join their billeting families around the province.The program has loyal supporters and to Stymiest's surprise, it wasn't hard to find enough homestays, even in a pandemic. "The gem of our program is our host families" and their dedication and willingness to step up, she said. "Finding host families was not an issue whatsoever."The Atlantic Education International program was started by the province in 1997.A visiting student in New Brunswick pays about $20,000 for a full year, which includes payment to the host family. The program also creates opportunities for New Brunswick educators to teach abroad in China, Bangladesh and Brazil.In 2019, the program generated more than $10 million in revenue.
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The power of words in crisis: Who hits mark, and who misses?
WASHINGTON — In moments of crisis, of war and terror, of loss and mourning, American leaders have sought to utter words to match the moment in hope that the power of oratory can bring order to chaos and despair.Lincoln at Gettysburg. Franklin Roosevelt during the Depression and World War II. Reagan after the Challenger disaster. Bill Clinton after the Oklahoma City bombing. George W. Bush with a bullhorn at Ground Zero in 2001 and Barack Obama after the slaughter of congregants at a South Carolina church.Each time, the speakers, Republican and Democrat, extemporaneously or with a script, managed to sound notes that brought at least a temporary sense of national unity and purpose.“I really think there is something at the very core of our humanity that only words can satisfy,” said Wayne Fields, author of “Union of Words: A History of Presidential Eloquence," and a professor at Washington University in St. Louis. “Almost as much as our need to be touched in the most desperate of circumstances is our need to be spoken to. Public despair in particular has to be literally addressed, I think, if it is to be overcome, must be articulated and then transcended.”In the aftermath of a violent insurrection at the U.S. Capitol, a cathedral of democracy, President Donald Trump did not meet that prescription. He scaled the walls of false equivalency and descended into the canyons of conspiracy.He stirred the riotous mob with his “fight like hell” speech before his supporters marched to the Capitol, then delivered a tepid appeal for nonviolence, telling his supporters he loved them. This came well after the man voters chose to succeed him, President-elect Joe Biden, had summoned outrage, empathy and a sense of a path forward.Trump has never been much for the big speech. Those he has given, like his Oval Office address about the pandemic in March, contained more than one large error. His preferred medium was Twitter, where his 280-characters-at-a-time rhetoric was a study in hortatory rather than oratory. And by Friday, Twitter had shut down his account permanently.The oratory of crisis typically consists of either a formal statement or an extemporaneous speech. Bush’s initial speech after 9-11 was not particularly well received. But his appearance in the rubble of the World Trade Center bombing was considered one of his finest moments, in which he found just the right words when speaking to rescue workers who said, “I can't hear you.”Using a bullhorn, Bush responded: “I can hear you! I can hear you! The rest of the world hears you. And the people who knocked these buildings down will hear all of us soon.”Other presidents have made more direct appeals for healing. Ronald Reagan, poised to deliver a State of the Union address, had to pivot to address the national tragedy of the explosion of the space shuttle Challenger, and the loss of its crew of seven, including the teacher Christa McAuliffe.“I know it is hard to understand, but sometimes painful things like this happen," Reagan said. "It’s all part of the process of exploration and discovery. It’s all part of taking a chance and expanding man’s horizons. The future doesn’t belong to the fainthearted; it belongs to the brave. The Challenger crew was pulling us into the future, and we’ll continue to follow them.”Clinton was known for his feel-your-pain persona, on display after the Oklahoma City bombing. “You have lost too much, but you have not lost everything," he said. "And you have certainly not lost America, for we will stand with you for as many tomorrows as it takes.”After the killing of congregants at Mother Emanuel church in Charleston, South Carolina, Obama sang the hymn “Amazing Grace” and also challenged the nation. “At some point," he said, "we as a country will have to reckon with the fact that this type of mass violence does not happen in other advanced countries. It doesn’t happen in other places with this kind of frequency. And it is in our power to do something about it.”Unlike Trump, Biden was unsparing in his remarks after the insurrection at the Capitol about where blame lay. “They weren’t protesters," Biden said. “Don’t dare call them protesters. They were a riotous mob, insurrectionists, domestic terrorists. It’s that basic. It’s that simple.”But Biden also promised a better day ahead, saying that the rioters did not represent the “true America.”“Oratory in such times, just by being composed at a time when things are falling apart, reassures and opens a door for positive responses and for hope,” Fields said. “Ironically, in being spoken to we can be reassured that we are being heard, that the fears and emotions we have been too distressed to compose, can be articulated, can be expressed.”Most times, presidents themselves don’t write the words that are most remembered, but their speechwriters know their voice and sentiments. Obama and Clinton heavily edited their speeches; Lincoln wrote many of his own. The most memorable words from Trump's inaugural address were about the need to end an “American carnage” that existed mostly in his own mind.Soon, Biden’s words will be the ones the nation examines. He has a mixed history with oratory. His first presidential campaign ended largely because he appropriated language from a British politician, Neil Kinnock, a literary theft that today seems almost benign. But Biden even then, in 1987, was also known for his ability to use words, albeit sometimes too many of them.The president-elect is fond of both lofty rhetoric spoken with an eye to history and the common language of the union hall. He will need to summon both in the days ahead, navigating the fractious end to the Trump presidency and imploring the nation to turn the page.The word crisis has its origins in the Greek language. Loosely translated, it means the stage of a disease where one lives or dies. It can be overused in the modern context, but few would argue the American democracy is not facing one. The challenge for crisis oratory is to not underplay the severity of the problem or foster a new sense of panic.The most effective oratory has, at its core, a sense of authenticity, which plays to Biden’s strength.“Words matter. Words can explain, inspire, console, and heal. In the past, presidents have tried to do these things, with various degrees of success,” said John J. Pitney, a professor of politics at Claremont McKenna College, adding: “Trump is unique in that he has made things much worse.”___Michael Tackett, deputy Washington bureau chief for The Associated Press, has been covering politics and government since 1986. Follow him on Twitter at http://twitter.com/tackettDCMichael Tackett, The Associated Press
17 hours ago
Migrants in Bosnia camp health checked after days in cold
BIHAC, Bosnia — Many migrants and refugees staying at a camp in northwestern Bosnia have complained of respiratory and skin infections after spending days in makeshift tents and containers amid freezing weather and snowstorms, aid workers warned.Most of the hundreds of migrants stuck at the Lipa facility near Bosnia’s border with Croatia have been accommodated in heated military tents following days of uncertainty after a fire gutted most of the camp on Dec. 23.Bosnia has faced sharp criticism for leaving around 1,000 people without shelter after the blaze. The authorities first said they would move the migrants to another location, but they ended up setting up military tents at the site instead.The Amnesty International rights group in a statement on Tuesday said a sustainable and durable solution for the migrants in Bosnia is needed. It said political bickering has marred efforts to deal with the crisis facing people fleeing war and poverty in their nations.“Accommodation is available to house most of the people currently sleeping rough in bitterly cold temperatures in Bosnia and Herzegovina," said Eve Geddie, Director of Amnesty International’s European Institutions Office. “What is lacking is the political will to make that happen.”Geddie added that the current crisis is also “a consequence of EU’s policy of fortifying its borders that has left thousands of people stranded on its periphery or in the neighbouring countries.Weather forecasters in Bosnia on Tuesday issued a warning for an upcoming spell of even colder weather in the coming days.The Lipa site also has lacked basic facilities such as electricity or running water and migrants lit fires for days to protect themselves from the biting cold. Many migrants at the camp said they haven't showered in a long time, while some have washed outside despite the cold.On Monday, doctors were screening migrants’ health at the Lipa camp and handing out medicines. It wasn't immediately clear whether any of the migrants might have COVID-19, said Verica Racevic from the Danish Refugee Council humanitarian group.“Some are under the system of febrile status, which means they have a temperature,” she said. “It’s not really easy to differentiate in those circumstances whether this is COVID-19 or this is any other kind of respiratory infection.”Impoverished and ethnically divided Bosnia has struggled with the influx of thousands of people who are trying to reach Western Europe through the Balkans. Aid groups estimate that hundreds of people have been sleeping rough in abandoned houses or improvised forest camps.Migrants at Lipa appeared to be pleased to finally have some shelter, warm food and medical help. Holding an umbrella in the snow, Suleiman Shahid from Pakistan said the new tents are warm and “suitable for living.”From Bosnia, migrants first aim to reach neighbouring European Union member state Croatia over illegal mountainous routes before moving on toward wealthier nations in the 27-nation bloc. They have complained of pushbacks and violence at the hands of Croatia's police.Kemal Softic, The Associated Press
16 hours ago
Should I get a COVID-19 vaccine if I've had the virus?
Should I get a COVID-19 vaccine if I’ve had the virus?Yes. Regardless of previous infection, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says people should plan on getting vaccinated when it's their turn.“It’s a pretty straightforward question,” said Johns Hopkins infectious disease specialist Dr. Amesh Adalja. “Yes, you need to get vaccinated.”After someone recovers, their immune system should keep them from getting sick again right away.“Your immune system is able to identify the virus, and protect itself,” said Dr. Saskia Popescu, an infectious disease expert at George Mason University.Scientists still don’t know exactly how long this immunity lasts or how strong it is, though recent research suggests the protection could last for several months.It’s impossible to know how long a person might be immune, said Dr. Prathit Kulkarni, an infectious disease expert at Baylor College of Medicine. “There’s no way to calculate that.”Vaccines, by contrast, are designed to bring about a more consistent and optimal immune response. And they should boost whatever preexisting immunity a person might have from an infection, experts say.“Since we’re in this pandemic, and don’t have a handle on it, the safer approach is to vaccinate,” Kulkarni said. “You don’t lose anything and you stand to benefit.”If you’ve been infected in the last three months, the CDC says it's OK to delay vaccination if you want to let others go first while supplies are limited.“All things being equal you would want the person with no protection to go first,” Adalja said.___The AP is answering your questions about the coronavirus in this series. Submit them at: FactCheck@AP.org.Read previous Viral Questions:If I’ve already had the coronavirus, can I get it again?How quickly do I need a second COVID-19 vaccine shot?Can I stop wearing a mask after getting a COVID-19 vaccine?The Associated Press
18 hours ago
For many, COVID-19 has changed the world of work for good
Yet such changes are also likely to be the preserve of white-collar workers, with new labour market entrants and the less well-educated set to face post-COVID-19 economies where most jobs growth is in low-wage sectors. "I think it would be a fallacy to think we will go back to where we were before," Philippines central bank Governor Benjamin Diokno told the Reuters Next forum. Hospitality and tourism are among those sectors worst-hit by stringent social-distancing rules and travel bans, while sectors that support the work-from-home economy are adding jobs, albeit often in low-wage roles.
17 hours ago
Sask. gov't remains mum on prospects of Parkside outbreak inquiry
The Saskatchewan government continues to refrain from saying whether it will hold a public inquiry into the COVID-19 outbreak at Regina's Parkside Extendicare home, where 41 residents have died since late November.The notion of an inquiry was first raised in mid-December by the Saskatchewan Union of Nurses (SUN), followed closely by the Saskatchewan NDP.Last week, both groups renewed their calls for a fact-finding process, with SUN sending a formal letter to Premier Scott Moe. The letter asked that any probe cover how COVID-19 got into the home, how it spread so quickly and broadly, what was done to lessen its impact and what preventative measures should be in place at the home going forward.At the outbreak's height, more than three-quarters of Parkside's original inhabitants became infected.In an emailed statement to CBC News last Friday, the Ministry of Health declined to directly address the question of an inquiry. The ministry did offer some details on its efforts to help prevent outbreaks in other care homes."We understand that [Saskatchewan Health Authority] has completed sites visits to all Extendicare facilities in Saskatchewan," the spokesperson said. "The results of these visits have been shared with homes who are working to address any risks identified."We acknowledge that this continues to be a difficult time for residents and families, and we want to thank the staff of the SHA and Extendicare for their commitment to the health and safety of those in their care."Extendicare operates four other Saskatchewan care homes besides Parkside: two others in Regina, one in Moose Jaw and one in Saskatoon. An outbreak was declared at the Preston Extendicare facility in Saskatoon on Dec. 10.According to the Saskatchewan Health Authority (SHA), Extendicare is the only private company operating long-term care homes in the province under a contract with the health authority. What the gov't has said beforeThe province has been asked at least twice before about a Parkside inquiry.In a Dec. 16 statement to CBC News, the health ministry said, "Our focus is on the safety and well-being of residents at all long-term care and personal care homes."In a COVID-19 news conference two weeks later, Health Minister Paul Merriman gave a similar answer when asked about a Parkside inquiry. "What I'm really focused on right now is what's happening today, what's happening in the next week and the next month with the vaccine rollout, with our hospitalization numbers. I'm trying not to look back at this moment in time," he said. "Will there be a time where we, where I, do that? For sure."CBC requested an interview with Merriman last week. Instead, four days later, the Ministry of Health sent its emailed statement, which did not clarify Merriman's remarks."We continue to support the SHA, who is working closely with Public Health, Infection Prevention and Control, and Occupational Health and Safety to ensure that guidelines and recommendations are followed closely," the statement read.'We had enough time to really prepare for this'Two professors of epidemiology at the University of Saskatchewan agree a broad inquiry into how the province addressed COVID-19 outbreaks in long-term care homes should be launched.Nazeem Muhajarine said the timing of the Parkside outbreak sticks out in particular, relative to the outbreaks experienced in Ontario and Quebec early in the pandemic."It did not happen until at the height of the second wave in Saskatchewan," Muhajarine said. "We had enough time to really prepare for this. We are not acting quickly enough to get ahead of the virus."Muhajarine's colleage Cory Neudorf said an inquiry could establish whether any factors specific to Saskatchewan could account for what happened."Then seeing, more importantly, how can those be then corrected into the future so that we have a long-term care system that is set up that's safer and is providing the type of care that we should expect for our seniors," Neudorf said.
16 hours ago
CBC
Canada's top soldier says he's not worried about U.S. military response in wake of Capitol riot
Canada's outgoing top military commander and his U.S. counterpart will have their first conversation today about the violent protests that rocked Washington last week and the impending political showdown over President Donald Trump.Gen. Jonathan Vance, who will step down as chief of the defence staff on Thursday, said he doesn't see the eruption of mob violence in the U.S. capital that temporarily halted a sitting of the U.S. Congress as a broader defence and security issue that might affect Canada.Vance did not speak with Chairman of the U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Mark Milley last week as supporters of outgoing President Donald Trump clashed with Capital Hill police, invaded the building and threatened lawmakers. The two military chiefs are frequently in touch because of the shared continent and Canada's status as one of the United States' oldest allies.In his final interview with CBC News as chief of the defence staff, Vance said he remains fully confident in the U.S. military's command structure and its ability to respond to alarming political events."We were all shocked and so were our colleagues in the United States," said Vance. "I did not have professional concerns about the capacity of the United States or its command authority and the military posture at all."Bilateral institutions such as NORAD and multilateral organizations such as NATO have continued to operate, Vance said."If there was something [Milley] was worried about as it relates to the military capacity of the U.S., the defence of North America or our missions overseas, he would have reached out [to allies]," said Vance, who added he was kept up to date "minute by minute" on last Wednesday's riot by the Canadian liaison officer at the Pentagon.Vance said he has no concerns about "our sovereignty or the defence of Canada" in connection with Wednesday's events, or about the potential of instability spilling over the border — but he acknowledged political concerns about extremism in Canada and how events south of the border could influence events here.The Canadian military has been grappling with right-wing extremism, anti-government rhetoric and hateful conduct in the ranks for the better part of two years. The three major branches — army, navy and air force — have issued specific orders meant to crack down on racism and discrimination.Defence Minister Harjit Sajjan has appointed an advisory panel to investigate the depth and extent of the problem in the wake of several reports of military members — mostly reservists — being involved with extremist groups.Those groups include the Proud Boys, the survivalist militia Three Percent movement and the white supremacist organization Soldiers of Odin.A CBC News investigation last fall uncovered the case of a Canadian Ranger who actively supported the latter two of those groups and was the subject of a military counterintelligence investigation after concerns were raised by allies — but was allowed to continue serving.The advisory panel is not in the same league as the full-throttle approach the military took five years ago — at the beginning of Vance's tenure — to combat sexual misconduct and violence within the ranks. That effort, known as Operation Honour, has yielded mixed results in its efforts to change the culture of the military.Vance acknowledged the military is taking a different approach to extremism."It's partly because we learned from Operation Honour what works and doesn't work inside [an institutional initiative] that has that kind of branding," he said.The approach to countering extremism is different, Vance said, because victims of sexual assault have needs and concerns than differ from those who experience racism.Vance ends his tenure as Canada's longest-serving defence chief of modern times. He said that while he is proud of the social change and initiatives launched under his command, many of those efforts still need to be seen through to completion.His toughest day as top commander, he said, occurred last April when a military maritime helicopter crashed in the Ionian Sea off Greece, killing six aircrew and sailors.In an interview with the Globe and Mail last week, Vance said western democracies inevitably will have to come up with a grand strategy to confront a more assertive China and a resurgent Russia. He repeated those comments Monday.Vance said he believes Canada's defence policy is well-placed to address the return of great power competition and believes the Liberal government will put the money into defence that it promised, despite the strain on public finances caused by the pandemic.With the deployment of troops to backstop long-term care homes in two provinces, Vance said, the pandemic has demonstrated the value of the military to Canadians.
17 hours ago
A young nurse explained that she had a few doubts about taking the jab but felt compelled to do so for the sake of the community and her role as a nurse.View on euronews
16 hours ago
Young Sudbury actor awaits world premiere
Walking down the red carpet at the 2021 Sundance Film Festival would have been “super cool” for Phoenix Wilson, but he’s content to watch the world premiere of his new film from the comfort of his own home.  The 15-year-old student at St. Charles College in Sudbury will be featured in a new American film called Wild Indian that tells the story of two school-aged children bound together by the murder of a classmate.  Wilson plays the younger version of the main character M’kwa in the film, which will have its virtual debut at the world-renowned film festival virtually between Jan. 28 and Feb. 3 this year. “There’s a really strong message in the film, and you really have to listen and watch to really understand the storyline,” said Wilson, who stars alongside Michael Greyeyes, Jesse Eisenberg and Chaske Spencer.  “I hope anybody who sees it enjoys it and takes something away from it. It really gets you thinking about how a 12-year-old boy could do something like that, and how his environment influenced him because of what he’s been through at such a young age.” The movie was written and directed by Lyle Mitchell Corbine Jr. and produced by Corbine, Thomas Mahoney and Eric Tavitian.  Wilson was first introduced to the role in 2017 when he was at actor-director Robert Redford’s property in Utah for a director’s lab based on the movie theme.  He started by filming a single scene and was later selected for the part when it was turned into a full-length film last year.  “Then I went back to Oklahoma,” he said. “It was really fun. I enjoyed everyone on the set, and it’s really beautiful there. It’s cold, too,” he added.  “I get to travel to a lot of places which is one of the coolest things about acting,” said Wilson. “I get to meet lots of new people. I never got to meet Michael Greyeyes or Jesse Eisenberg, but it’s cool being in a film with them.” Wild Indian tells the story of M’kwa, a boy who comes from a “dysfunctional family,” according to Wilson.  “He was not raised in a good atmosphere, and he is in love with this one girl, but the girl is with another boy in his class,” he said.  “He is very jealous, and he has a lot of emotions. One day, M’kwa and his friend are practising shooting a gun. My character shoots the little boy that the girl likes. The film is about those two friends growing apart and then coming back together as a adults and process what they did when they were kids.”  The role was challenging for Wilson because he didn’t have much in common with M’kwa — he called it a “far stretch acting-wise” — but he also had a lot of sympathy for the character.  “At first, I really didn’t understand why M’kwa was the way that he was. How could a 12-year-old boy shoot another kid in his class?” he said.  “I went over the script with my mom, and she really helped me understand. My mom did a really good job of explaining it to me so I could really grasp what led the character to behave in this way, so I could really bring him to life.”  Wilson, who calls M’Chigeeng First Nation on Manitoulin Island home but currently resides in Copper Cliff, started his acting career when he was four years old.  He has acted in movies and television shows — including Letterkenny and the popular Netflix series Longmire — as well as provided voiceover for a CBC Kids cartoon series called Song and Jax Maple Mysteries.  He was also the host for the TVO series My Home My Life, and was featured in a music video for the song Suplex by the Canadian group A Tribe Called Red.  Wilson’s mother Martha, who works as an educator at St. Charles College, was the one who introduced him to acting at a young age.  “We’ve always had a rule that if I don’t enjoy it, then I don’t have to do it anymore,” he said.  “My mom is the one who constantly goes over lines with me, and she’s the one who helps me with auditions and stuff. She is my number one supporter.”  Wilson’s grandfather travels with him whenever he is working on a project and has seen a lot of the world as a result.  When he isn’t acting, Wilson attends school just like all of his other friends. Right now, he is engaged in virtual learning due to the pandemic.  “There aren’t many jobs out there right now because of COVID-19, so I am focusing on school,” he said. “I really like the virtual learning, being on Zoom, and then doing your work afterward. I find it super easy.”  Eventually, Wilson hopes to go to school to become a veterinarian.  “I have always had a really deep love for animals so I thought that would be fitting. I mean, it’s a really long time for school – eight years – so I am not looking forward to that,” he said.  “I want to do a couple years of school at Laurentian, and then hopefully go to Guelph. I will do a bit of acting on the side as well. That’s the plan.”  Wilson’s mother is very proud of her son, and she can’t wait to see the world premiere of Wild Indian at the 2021 Sundance Film Festival.  “We are so excited. It was just rotten luck that 2020 was the way it was because it’s always been a red-carpet dream of Phoenix’s to go to a premiere, and this is one of the biggest film festivals in the world,” she said.  “It would have been really exciting, but we’re still really excited to watch the film on TV. I can’t wait to buy tickets.”  Wilson hopes that anyone who sees the film enjoys it and takes something away from it in the end.  “I hope people can watch the film and it gives them some insight into why this act was done and what he had gone through in his life to bring him to that point.”  The Local Journalism Initiative is made possible through funding from the federal government. sud.editorial@sunmedia.caColleen Romaniuk, Local Journalism Initiative Reporter, The Sudbury Star
16 hours ago
Health-care workers battled burnout before COVID-19 — now it's even worse, experts warn
While Lhamo Dolkar worked on the front lines as a registered nurse in the early months of the pandemic, her precautions after coming home from a shift were a stressful but necessary routine. First, the Whitby, Ont., resident would strip down in her garage. Then she'd rub alcohol on her body before going up to have a shower. Then, finally, she'd get to hug her four boys — even though fears about infecting her family with COVID-19 still lingered in her mind. "My kids have become so programmed now that they ask me, 'Can I touch you now? Do you have coronavirus?'" she recalled. "That truly breaks my heart." Dolkar, who worked in front-line patient care in Toronto and is now in a public health role, is one of thousands of Ontario health-care workers facing constant fear and stress as the pandemic enters its second year. New Canadian research also suggests feelings of burnout were high long before CO


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