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Indoor air quality in printing press in Kuwait

Indoor air quality in printing press in Kuwait

pp 1–14 | Cite as
Indoor air quality in printing press in Kuwait
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Abstract
The well-being of the workers in any place is the main health goal of any office; thereby, this study has focused on the printing press due to the inadequate indoor air quality. Most of the pollutants are emitted from the storage, use and disposal of chemicals and liquid/solid waste. Printing inks, toner and cartridges contain volatile organic components that have the potential to generate odors and can cause serious health risk. The press is located in a separate building, away from the main work area containing administration and laboratories. The press is responsible for various tasks, from visiting cards to conferences proceedings. Air quality inside the printing press has been assessed taking into consideration associated offices, administration, editing, printing and publications sections, and heating ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) system performance was evaluated through continuous monitoring of temperature, humidity and carbon dioxide (CO2) levels. The assessment of the indoor air quality in printing press was completed by accurate measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), CO2, temperature, humidity, ozone and particulate matters. These measured values were compared with national and international guidelines set for an acceptable indoor air quality. The results will be used for the identification of sources, which can be implemented in mitigation strategies to abate the prevalence of sick building syndrome if exists. Samples taken for 8 working hours revealed VOCs levels approached 7.72 ppm where 33.82% contribution was from halogenated compounds where predominant compound was refrigerant trichlorofloromethane (R-11) leaked from refrigeration loop of HVAC system, followed by oxygenated group 25.84% mainly consisting of methyl tertiary butyl ether common additive of gasoline emitted from light vehicles. Aliphatic group constituted 25.62% of TVOC, where predominant compound was solvent cyclohexane, and aromatic group was the least 14.72% of the TVOC consisting of toluene common thinner.
Keywords
Printing press Indoor air quality Volatile organic compounds CO2 Sick building syndrome 
Editorial responsibility: Mohamed Fathy Yassin.
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Notes
Acknowledgement
Authors would like to acknowledge the service division in the governmental research institute for providing access to printing press facilities and KISR team for conducting thorough research about indoor air quality in the printing press.
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