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5 Mistakes Home Improvement Companies Make When Texting Clients

5 Mistakes Home Improvement Companies Make When Texting Clients

A growing number of customers today prefer to communicate by text, especially when it comes to quick messages such as confirming an appointment. Yet less than half of home improvement companies offer the option to text clients. That’s good news for you. Simply bringing up business texting gives you an advantage over competitors. 

But there are still pitfalls to avoid. Understanding the most common mistakes that specialty contractors make when texting homeowners will help you close more business and create satisfied customers. Here are five tips for success.

Today’s consumers demand timely information, but they also want a personalized experience. This is especially true for home improvement sales because there’s emotion behind those purchases. That means nothing generic. Use the homeowner’s name when you text. Make it clear that your message is designed just for them. 

Many remodelers believe they can just buy a list and send out ads to bunches of people. That can get you sued really fast. It’s critically important that businesses follow the Federal Communication Commission (FCC) rules which include getting written permission from homeowners to text them. 

A lot of companies now automate every initial message to the homeowner. This increases productivity, and we’re big advocates of automated appointment reminders. But it’s critically important that remodelers text in a way that feels authentic rather than generic. I’m a believer in automation but I’m also a huge fan of live conversations with homeowners via text or phone once the sale is made. 

We find a lot of instances where salespeople are using personal cells phones without any tracking or oversight from management. A texting system should be all encompassing with messages that originate from a landline that homeowners can call. This creates a greater sense of trust on the part of customers.

I believe the theme of this decade is interconnected software. If you show me a company that refuses to connect its product, I’ll show you a company that will soon be out of business. Make sure that whatever technology you use is scalable and connected.